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Ellie 2.0

Ellie 2.0

Mondays 7:30-8:30 AM

We’re generally aware of hopeless idealists, but how many of us have ever actually heard from one?

Ellie 2.0 is all about idealism and the journey of one particular idealist—Ellie Krug—as she works to make the world a better place.

Only, there’s a slight complicating factor: Ellie’s a 61-year-old transgender woman.

That simple demographic sometimes makes things particularly interesting. Or daunting.

Where does the “2.0” come in?

Because in another life, when Ellie presented as a man and worked for big corporations as a trial attorney—the nickname was “Killer Krug”—there was no place for idealism.

Today, remade as her “true” female self, Ellie’s become a doer and believer in humanity and the common good. As she likes to say, “Ninety-nine percent of us want to do the right thing; it’s just that most are afraid to do what’s right.”

Usually, Ellie’s not afraid and most of the time, she does what’s right. Come along as she tries to lead the way, traveling America to make our country whole and truly great for all and everyone.

Ellie 2.0.

Engaging. Imaginative. Fun. And real.

Every Monday morning from 7:30-8:00 a.m. CST by airwaves or livestream on AM950, the Progressive Voice of Minnesota

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Ellie 2.0 – June 18, 2018

James Meredith, the First African American to Attend Ole Miss & Ellie on Learning How to “Write Like a Human”

Block A: James Meredith, the first African American to attend Ole Miss, the University of Mississippi, and his persistence; Block B: My persistence in learning how to “write like a human” (as opposed to writing as a lawyer) and writing/launching my book, Getting to Ellen: A Memoir about Love, Honesty and Gender Change (2013).

A Look Back At Jackie Robinson

Block A: Jackie Robinson, the all-American hero who broke the color barrier in professional baseball; Block B: My own experiences in encountering racism.

Establishing A Non Profit And Memorial Day Remembrance

Block A: My first attempt to do good in the world by establishing a nonprofit in Cedar Rapids—and how I failed; Block B: Remembering that on this Memorial Day, we all need to do our best to reclaim America’s authenticity and values.

Zora Neale Hurston & Inclusivity Rippling To Another Human

Block A: Zora Neale Hurston, a writer who’s grandparents on both sides were slaves; Zora wrote about living as a black person in the first half of the 20th century. She interviewed and wrote about Cudjo Lewis, the then last person living who had been brought to America as a slave; Block B: My recent…

Dr. Megan Coffee And Human Inclusivity

Block A: Dr. Megan Coffee, an under-the-radar idealist who has dedicated her life to improving medical conditions in Haiti; Block B: How I’ve heard that my message about human inclusivity isn’t always received well.

International Adoption And Ellie’s Story Of Bering An Adoptive Parent

Block A: The work of Harry and Bertha Holt, who founded the first international adoption agency following the Korean war; Block B: My own story as an adoptive parent to two Korean-born girls and my gratitude for the work undertaken by the Holts.

Johan Van Hulst Saving Children from Concentration Camps and Inclusivity Trainings

Block A: Johan Van Hulst and others saved 500-1000 Jewish children and babies from Nazi concentration camps and certain death; he believed that the risk to his own life was worth it; Block B: How my human inclusivity trainings have sparked compassion from others.

The Life of Linda Brown from Brown vs. Board of Education and the Price of Being an Idealist

Block A: Commemorating the life of Linda Brown, the plaintiff in the landmark Supreme Court Decision, Brown v. Board of Education; Block B: The price of being an idealist.

Bryan Stevenson On Saving 100+ Inmates From Death Row & Ellie On “The Identity Game”

Block A: Bryan Stevenson, a lawyer and contemporary idealist whose advocacy has saved 100+ from death row and who’s the architect of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama; Block B: Ellie’s audience-participatory “Identity Game” where people want to be known for being “compassionate.”